Getting the shirt design mocked up (it will be improved), it’ll be printed on an organic cotton shirt so the background will be close to this color. This is from Roubo’s famous plate 17. We are going to donate every cent of the proceeds to GreenWood, a charity that aims to protect tropical forests and work alongside residents of remote forest communities to help them earn more by managing their forests and creating valuable wood products than they would otherwise derive from conventional slash-and-burn agriculture or illegal logging. Curtis Buchanan, the Windsor chair maker, is a co-founder. Patrick Edwards has given us enthusiastic permission to use his school’s slogan, We Save The Past For The Future, as it works perfectly with Roubo and our goals.

Getting the shirt design mocked up (it will be improved), it’ll be printed on an organic cotton shirt so the background will be close to this color. This is from Roubo’s famous plate 17. We are going to donate every cent of the proceeds to GreenWood, a charity that aims to protect tropical forests and work alongside residents of remote forest communities to help them earn more by managing their forests and creating valuable wood products than they would otherwise derive from conventional slash-and-burn agriculture or illegal logging. Curtis Buchanan, the Windsor chair maker, is a co-founder. Patrick Edwards has given us enthusiastic permission to use his school’s slogan, We Save The Past For The Future, as it works perfectly with Roubo and our goals.

andrewness660:

Alight

In kind light this cabinet’s contorted grain shapeshifts. Tea tree stained water flowing over river stones – sunlight penetrating, reflecting, then penetrating again; sandstone escarpments set ablaze by dying days, a campfire, a nebula, solar flares, desire.

Some things can be set alight without using flame.

Images Cathy Taylor Photography

Sculpture Krista Berga

Click on images to view at full size.

You all may want to take a look at Andrew Ness’ blog. He is an Australian woodworker who makes incredible pieces. 

I just got this 3/16 double bead plane from Patrick Leach of The Superior Works. It is boxed with boxwood and made of quartersawn beech. The double bead allows you to plane in both directions so you can always plane with the grain and allows you to put a bead on both sides of a board. The heel (the back of the plane) is stamped “3/16” and “1881”. The toe (the front of the plane) is stamped “J. KELLOGG” and “AMHERST MS.” After a little research here is what I found out about the plane & maker:

DATM Information

James was part of Kellogg, Fox & Washburn until 1839, Kellogg & Fox from 1839-1840 and J. Kellogg & Son from 1865-1867. William Kellogg, his son, continued to use his mark after his retirement in 1867

Identifying Marks

J.KELLOGG/AMHERST.MS

General Information

Kellog’s first company was purchased from Eli Dickinson and became a wildly successful manufacturer of planes. At one point, a portion of Amherst was called “Kelloggville” and was occupied by two of his factories; even producing 150 to 200 planes a day, they were often unable to fill all the orders they received. They are often deemed the highest quality planes ever manufactured on a large scale and collectors abound on the internet praising their worth. In 1886, the dam supplying power for the factories was washed away and production remained idle for several years.

I’m going to clean this up and put it to use very soon. Thank you Patrick.

Routing a cove in the bottom of the mahogany table top. Somewhere Matt Bickford just shed a tear. I wish I had molding planes to do this. I’m going to make some in the Fall.

Routing a cove in the bottom of the mahogany table top. Somewhere Matt Bickford just shed a tear. I wish I had molding planes to do this. I’m going to make some in the Fall.

I figured out how to (poorly) use the time lapse on my phone. I put a heavy chamfer on all of the edges of the table base and blended them in at the corners. Gives it a kind of leaf shape when you step back and look at it.

Dovetailed Walnut Knock Box

I made this for my good friends Greg and Susan’s coffee lab. Dovetail construction and floating panel in the bottom. Finished with four coats of shellac and a nice carnauba wax. They use this for their espresso grounds. 

The Traveling Anarchist’s Tool Chest

I need a tool chest for when I travel to teach. My next project will be this smaller version of The Anarchist’s Tool Chest. I think I’ll use soft maple and the “Coastal Blue” milk paint. 

Spalted oak is so cool. Nice quartersawn stuff. 

Spalted oak is so cool. Nice quartersawn stuff. 

14 foot by 40 inch bubinga slab at my good buddy (and wood dealer) Joe’s shop. With the base this table weighs 700lbs. I went over there this morning to help him engineer the supports for the 12 inch breadboard ends. In return he gave me some beautiful spalted quartersawn oak.

14 foot by 40 inch bubinga slab at my good buddy (and wood dealer) Joe’s shop. With the base this table weighs 700lbs. I went over there this morning to help him engineer the supports for the 12 inch breadboard ends. In return he gave me some beautiful spalted quartersawn oak.

Working on a dovetailed walnut box.